Uncategorized

New stories this week

alice springs, Australia, christmas tree recycling, fairhope alabama, global warming, gulf coast, milkweed, monarch butterfly, sacred gum tree, smithsonian national museum of natural history, solar radiation, swainson’s warbler, volcanic eruptions

Small volcanic eruptions could be slowing global warming—new ground-, air- and satellite measurements show that small volcanic eruptions that occurred between 2000 and 2013 have deflected almost double the amount of solar radiation previously estimated. By knocking incoming solar energy back out into space, sulfuric acid particles from these recent eruptions could be responsible for decreasing global temperatures.

http://laurajmerrilltreetalker.com

Sarychev_Peak_Volcano_erupts_on_Matua_Island

Sacred Gum Tree Leaves Threaten Future of Australian Pro Tour Tennis in Alice Springs—A 2014 Tennis Australia report expressed concern about the number of leaves that fell on the court during the 2014 event, but organizers cannot trim or cut down the trees without approval from native title holders and the council, according to the tennis club’s tournament director Matt Roberts.

5886150-3x2-940x627

Parks Canada Using Old Christmas Trees to Protect Sand Dunes—piles of old Christmas trees are stacked up along Brackley Beach of Prince Edward Island to fill in what are known as blow out areas where sand has drifted away.

How the Gulf Coast Can Save the Monarchs—a dramatic decline in monarchs has been linked to the loss of milkweeds, one of the most important monarch food sources in Eastern North America.
Longleaf pines of Gulf Coast may well determine whether the monarch and its great annual migration survives. More than 90 percent of all milkweed and climbing milkweed species found in eastern North America occur within the larger longleaf pine ecosystem and 15 or so of those species are found nowhere else but in longleaf forests.

monarch-on-tuberosa-70e78a248444f7e9

A New Home for a Secretive Songbird—researchers from Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History report that Swainson’s warbler has found a new safe haven: private pine plantations.

Swainson's_Warbler_s52-11-424_l_1

 

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alice springs, Australia, christmas tree recycling, fairhope alabama, global warming, gulf coast, milkweed, monarch butterfly, sacred gum tree, smithsonian national museum of natural history, solar radiation, swainson's warbler, volcanic eruptions

New stories this week

Small volcanic eruptions could be slowing global warming—new ground-, air- and satellite measurements show that small volcanic eruptions that occurred between 2000 and 2013 have deflected almost double the amount of solar radiation previously estimated. By knocking incoming solar energy back out into space, sulfuric acid particles from these recent eruptions could be responsible for decreasing global temperatures.

http://laurajmerrilltreetalker.com

Sarychev_Peak_Volcano_erupts_on_Matua_Island

Sacred Gum Tree Leaves Threaten Future of Australian Pro Tour Tennis in Alice Springs—A 2014 Tennis Australia report expressed concern about the number of leaves that fell on the court during the 2014 event, but organizers cannot trim or cut down the trees without approval from native title holders and the council, according to the tennis club’s tournament director Matt Roberts.

5886150-3x2-940x627

Parks Canada Using Old Christmas Trees to Protect Sand Dunes—piles of old Christmas trees are stacked up along Brackley Beach of Prince Edward Island to fill in what are known as blow out areas where sand has drifted away.

How the Gulf Coast Can Save the Monarchs—a dramatic decline in monarchs has been linked to the loss of milkweeds, one of the most important monarch food sources in Eastern North America.
Longleaf pines of Gulf Coast may well determine whether the monarch and its great annual migration survives. More than 90 percent of all milkweed and climbing milkweed species found in eastern North America occur within the larger longleaf pine ecosystem and 15 or so of those species are found nowhere else but in longleaf forests.

monarch-on-tuberosa-70e78a248444f7e9

A New Home for a Secretive Songbird—researchers from Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History report that Swainson’s warbler has found a new safe haven: private pine plantations.

Swainson's_Warbler_s52-11-424_l_1

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Uncategorized

Treetalker Stories for Nov 15

Three stories this week: _77763865_777591091st, Liberia is to become the first nation in Africa to completely stop cutting down its trees – Norway will pay the impoverished country $150 million to stop deforestation by 2020. (BBC)

http://laurajmerrilltreetalker.com

Next, The American Chestnut Foundation and the State University of New York’s College of Environmental Science and Forestry have BOTH taken on the challenge of returning the American chestnut to North American Forests, albeit in their own unique ways. It’s a good story. Check out my website and links to find out more.

54526e1c0079e.preview-620 _77763865_77759109

Lastly – as I’ve said before, the greening of the cities by planting fruit and nut trees for the benefit of the citizenry is an up and coming idea. Another example is happening in Davenport, Iowa. Christened the Quad-Cities Community Food Forest, it will contain pawpaw (the poor man’s banana!) American persimmon, chestnut (probably not the American species) and pecan. What a great idea – keep it up, America!!

 

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community orchard, Environment, fruit trees, Nature, trees, trees in the cities, Trees in the News

Treetalker Stories for Nov 15

Three stories this week: _77763865_777591091st, Liberia is to become the first nation in Africa to completely stop cutting down its trees – Norway will pay the impoverished country $150 million to stop deforestation by 2020. (BBC)

http://laurajmerrilltreetalker.com

Next, The American Chestnut Foundation and the State University of New York’s College of Environmental Science and Forestry have BOTH taken on the challenge of returning the American chestnut to North American Forests, albeit in their own unique ways. It’s a good story. Check out my website and links to find out more.

54526e1c0079e.preview-620 _77763865_77759109

Lastly – as I’ve said before, the greening of the cities by planting fruit and nut trees for the benefit of the citizenry is an up and coming idea. Another example is happening in Davenport, Iowa. Christened the Quad-Cities Community Food Forest, it will contain pawpaw (the poor man’s banana!) American persimmon, chestnut (probably not the American species) and pecan. What a great idea – keep it up, America!!

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Ann Arbor, antibiotic-producing soil microbes, Australia, Biotropica, Bristlecone pine, bur oak, campus orchard, community orchard, CSIRO, Environment, fruit trees, Linda & Dick Busher, Nature, NPR, photography, Ross Business School, solar power, trees, trees in the cities, Trees in the News, U of Mich, U of Philadelphia, Uncategorized

New stories from The Treetalker

First, a 250 year old Bur oak gets moved at the Ann Arbor campus of the U of Michigan to make way for the expansion of the Ross Business School – controversial, because it was pricey to do, but in the immortal words of George Pope Morris, “Woodman, spare that tree!”

aa1_9331-b96b6e12867a29dc863f33013726eaff01d3ba3e-s4-c85

Also, a lovely slide show of the Bristlecone pine, photos courtesy of Linda and Dr. Dick Busher. Check out my website for that:

http://laurajmerrilltreetalker.com

Also some additional stories you may find of interest:

A CSIRO test plant in Australia has broken a world record and proved solar power could efficiently replace fossil fuels. “… this step proves solar has the potential to compete with the peak performance capabilities of fossil fuel sources,” says Dr. Alex Wonhas, CSIRO’s Energy Director.

orchard2Research is being done to ascertain the role of various antibiotic-producing soil microbes in the composition and variety of tree species in tropical rainforests.

And—seems to be catching on, this— The U of Pennsylvania community is coming together to plant a campus orchard. These guys aren’t the first, and hopefully won’t be the last.

 

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Ann Arbor, antibiotic-producing soil microbes, Australia, Bristlecone pine, bur oak, campus orchard, community orchard, CSIRO, Environment, fruit trees, Linda & Dick Busher, NPR, photography, Ross Business School, solar power, trees, trees in the cities, Trees in the News, U of Mich, U of Philadelphia, Uncategorized

New stories from The Treetalker

First, a 250 year old Bur oak gets moved at the Ann Arbor campus of the U of Michigan to make way for the expansion of the Ross Business School – controversial, because it was pricey to do, but in the immortal words of George Pope Morris, “Woodman, spare that tree!”

aa1_9331-b96b6e12867a29dc863f33013726eaff01d3ba3e-s4-c85

Also, a lovely slide show of the Bristlecone pine, photos courtesy of Linda and Dr. Dick Busher. Check out my website for that:

http://laurajmerrilltreetalker.com

Also some additional stories you may find of interest:

A CSIRO test plant in Australia has broken a world record and proved solar power could efficiently replace fossil fuels. “… this step proves solar has the potential to compete with the peak performance capabilities of fossil fuel sources,” says Dr. Alex Wonhas, CSIRO’s Energy Director.

orchard2Research is being done to ascertain the role of various antibiotic-producing soil microbes in the composition and variety of tree species in tropical rainforests.

And—seems to be catching on, this— The U of Pennsylvania community is coming together to plant a campus orchard. These guys aren’t the first, and hopefully won’t be the last.

Standard
community orchard, Environment, Nature, photography, trees, trees in the cities, Trees in the News

New stories from The Treetalker

First, a 250 year old Bur oak gets moved at the Ann Arbor campus of the U of Michigan to make way for the expansion of the Ross Business School – controversial, because it was pricey to do, but in the immortal words of George Pope Morris, “Woodman, spare that tree!”

aa1_9331-b96b6e12867a29dc863f33013726eaff01d3ba3e-s4-c85

Also, a lovely slide show of the Bristlecone pine, photos courtesy of Linda and Dr. Dick Busher. Check out my website for that:

http://laurajmerrilltreetalker.com

Also some additional stories you may find of interest:

A CSIRO test plant in Australia has broken a world record and proved solar power could efficiently replace fossil fuels. “… this step proves solar has the potential to compete with the peak performance capabilities of fossil fuel sources,” says Dr. Alex Wonhas, CSIRO’s Energy Director.

orchard2Research is being done to ascertain the role of various antibiotic-producing soil microbes in the composition and variety of tree species in tropical rainforests.

And—seems to be catching on, this— The U of Pennsylvania community is coming together to plant a campus orchard. These guys aren’t the first, and hopefully won’t be the last.

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